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Archive for the ‘Closed Loop – Zero Waste’ Category

Pop-ups, orange peel and African food

We spoke to the Groundnut team about African cuisine, how the pop-up model limits food waste and a circular economy story about orange peel. What is The Groundnut and why did you start it? The Groundnut is a project run by the three of us, Folayemi Brown, Duval Timothy and...

Festival Organisers – Plan a Zero Waste Festival

  The majority of events currently recycle only 15% of their waste (from WRAP's Zero Waste Events resource). To ensure your event does better than 15%, check out these waste management tips for planning a zero waste festival. And why go zero waste? As well as the environmental reasons, such reduced resource-use and greenhouse...

Festival Traders – Recycling Packaging

How to Curb your Packaging Waste!    When planning the packaging for your food stand, stick to the 3 r's: reduce, re-use and recycle. Reducing your Packaging:   * Review your packaging - think about what is used.* Minimise double wrapping and double bagging of foods.   Reusable and Refillable Products:   [caption id="attachment_5562"...

Sustainable Festivals

[caption id="attachment_4911" align="alignright" width="400"] Image from Askbabycotswold.co.uk[/caption] The UK festival season is about to kick off!   And with the industry on the rise and rise over the past 10 years, some festivals are now as large as small cities. And that can mean a huge consumption of food, water and fossil fuels -...

Scotland’s Waste Regulations

There’s just over a month to go until Scotland’s new waste regulations come into force for businesses. From 1st January 2014:  
  • Glass, metal, plastic, paper and card must be presented separately for  collection
  • Food businesses in non-rural areas producing more than 50kg of food waste a...

Closing the loop on waste: Zero Waste Olympics 2012

 London 2012 has been heralded as the greatest event that the UK has ever held, as well as the first ever Zero Waste Olympics and Paralympics of the modern era. To achieve this, LOCOG decided that 70% of waste would be recycled, reused or composted. The rest...